• Chris Steele

The Water Was Cold

Be Strong, Be Well — Monday, June 29


Our worship assemblies have changed in many ways. With social distancing, wearing masks, the way we serve and partake of the Lord’s supper, not shaking hands or hugging, there are plenty of comments made about how anxious we all are to return to how things used to be.

Then yesterday (Sunday), was refreshing with the baptism of Jessica Denham. It reminded us of how the gospel is still the same. The message of Jesus Christ and salvation can still touch the heart and soul of one in need. We still rejoice when someone goes down into the waters of baptism and rises up from that burial as a new member of God’s family.

At first, we were not sure how everything would work out. We wanted everyone to be safe. Although I wore a mask, nothing else was different from baptisms I have done before—even the cold water in the baptistry. I apologized. But Jessica said she didn’t think Jesus complained about the temperature of the water when He was baptized. She wasn’t going to complain either.

Those who lingered a few minutes after worship to witness this great event, were able to congratulate her from a distance. We prayed on her behalf. We asked God to help us help her in her growth process. This is how it should be—older Christians teaching younger Christians. We all can influence a newborn babe in Christ for good. These things will never change! —Chris

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